The Art of the List

Lists have always been a great way of organizing your thoughts but in this era of ever-shrinking attention spans they can also make an effective communication tool. Here are the top reasons why I think lists work so well:

  1. Lists force writers to organize their thoughts.
  2. The basic structure of a list is simple and easy to understand.
  3. Lists eliminate fluff.
  4. Lists help break up content into manageable chunks that are easy to scan.
  5. The average four-year-old can count to 10 … which means that the current U.S. market for top 10 lists is estimated at 285,706,894 people.

Bonus Lists:

A counterpoint (i.e. lists suck):

Update:

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