Tag Archives: Graphs

You Are What You Watch

Experian-Simmons released some survey data in December that looked at the relative popularity of major television shows for three different political groups: liberal Democrats; conservative Republicans; and middle-of-the-road voters. Each show was given an index based on the concentration of specific voters and this information was used to create lists of the top programs for each political group in both entertainment and news categories.

Although these top ten lists were interesting on their own, the fact that each individual TV program actually had an index rating for all three groups offers an opportunity for more complex analysis. The most obvious next step involves comparing pairs of groups in a 2D scatterplot chart. The Tableau visualization below shows the results.

A few notes:

  • Entertainment shows are in blue, news shows are in orange.
  • Shows without enough data for a particular group were still plotted as a zero index.
  • Hovering over each data point reveals the show and its indices.

 

The first thing I noticed was that news shows were much more partisan than entertainment shows. In fact, almost all of the shows with the most extreme scores were either news shows (primarily FOX and MSNBC) or fake news shows (Comedy Central’s Daily Show and Colbert Report). PBS gets a few high scores on the liberal side but the standard television networks are all fairly evenly watched.

Another thing that strikes me is how similar the watching habits of middle-of-the-road voters are to those of conservatives Republicans. The only noticeable exception occurs with news programs, but it is a pretty big exception: FOX News. All of the top ten conservative news programs were all on FOX while none of the top middle-of-the-road news programs were on that network. It might be encouraging for conservative politicians to see the similarities in entertainment interests between conservative voters and independents but I suspect that the gulf in news sources would be hard to overcome.

Many of the other differences have been noted elsewhere but are worth repeating: liberal Democrats tend to favor funnier shows and stories involving morally complex characters while conservative Republicans favor shows where people are doing stuff — either real work or reality competitions.

Of course, having complained about the lack of 2D analysis for this data in the major online outlets, I would be remiss if I didn’t point out the fact that each show has three indices apiece. Logically, we should be trying to show the data in a 3D scatterplot.

This isn’t as easy as it sounds since most of the major charting applications aren’t very good in 3D and they don’t provide any interactive option for the web that I could find. The best options seemed to be R or something called CanvasXpress — neither of which I had worked with before. I chose R, which allowed me to create both static and interactive 3D plots. However, only screenshots of the interactive plot are available at the moment. Several hours later …

What ‘The Office’ Gets Wrong About the Office

I start a new job next week and so I’ve been working on documenting all of my old tasks and projects in preparation for the transition. As I was going through old e-mails, I came across the introductory note my manager sent out to the department on my first day back in June 2004. Comparing it to the departure e-mail from my current manager, it’s amazing to see the changes in personnel over a seven-year span.

I prepared this chart using the distribution list from both e-mails, a drawing program, and a site that creates proportional venn diagrams. Only eight people are listed twice — including me and a person who left the company and has since returned. Some of the people who are only listed once have more tenure then me — they just may have gone to/come from another department. Still, it represents an interesting fact about the modern office. Change is constant.

Favre-a-Palooza

Now that we can safely say that Brett Favre has retired (notwithstanding rumors to the contrary), I thought it was time to pull out some data on the indecisive quarterback’s career touchdown passes. Stats on passes say a lot about the relationship between a quarterback and his receivers so I wanted to create a visual that captured some of these stories.

The chart below shows each touchdown pass that Brett Favre threw during his NFL career and displays it up by receiver (vertical axis), season (horizontal axis), average yardage per month (size of marker), and team (color of marker).

Packer Fans will immediately recognize the significance of some of the data points. For the rest of you, here are a few highlights:

  • Sterling Sharpe caught Brett Favre’s first touchdown pass as a Green Bay Packer in 1992 and continued to be the quarterback’s primary receiver for the next three years. The 5x All-Pro led the NFL in touchdown receptions in both 1992 and 1994 and would certainly have played a major role in the team’s subsequent success if he hadn’t suffered a career-ending neck injury at the end of the 1994 season.
  • Following Sharpe’s early exit from football, Favre was forced to distribute his passes among a broader range of players, chief among them wide receivers Robert Brooks and Antonio Freeman. These two players would serve as the primary pillars of the passing game throughout Favre’s most successful period with Green Bay.
  • During the 1996 season (the year the Packers won Super Bowl XXXI), Favre threw touchdowns to ten different receivers, a career high. His total touchdown pass yardage that year also reached a high water mark.
  • Following Favre’s two Super Bowl appearances, there was a noticeable dropoff in the number of new players catching touchdowns. It is not clear whether it was because the receiving core had stabilized or the coaches were focused on developing other aspects of the team but there were no fresh faces in the 1998 season and only two (Corey Bradford and Donald Driver) in 1999.
  • Favre did not have another pair of favorite “big play” receivers until his last two seasons with the Packers, when he had both Driver and Greg Jennings.
  • After Favre’s retirement from the Packers, he was introduced to an entirely new slate of receivers with the New York Jets in 2008. This situation was repeated in 2009 when he signed up with the Minnesota Vikings. He threw his final touchdown pass to Percy Harvin in December 2010.