Infographics and Data Visualization (Week 3)

The goal of this week’s assignment is to review some global aid data from the Guardian and evaluate how this information should be presented.  This is a two-part assignment and I have been able to download the data and let my thoughts percolate over the past few days. The focus is on the aid transparency index, which uses a broad set of criteria to rank major aid donors on their openness.

I’ll have to admit that my first reaction after looking at the data a bit was a muted “so what?” A simple rank of the aid organizations shows some of the usual good samaritans at the top and an apparent decline in transparency that roughly corresponds to a drop in GDP per capita (or possibly happiness or density of heavy metal bands).

Part of my lukewarm response stems from the fact that don’t really know what the consequences of transparency (or lack of transparency) means. Is there a concern about influence? Bribery? Funding of criminal or terrorist organizations? The U.S. aid organizations are kind of in the middle of the pack, which I suppose is not ideal. However, the U.S. list includes the Department of Defense, which I wouldn’t necessarily expect to be that open given the paticular nature of its mission.

Other questions that come to mind include:

  • What criteria are used to pick the organizations in this list? Who’s missing?
  • Do other military organizations make the list?
  • How is aid defined?
  • Why are some country’s scores aggregated while others are listed separately by organization?

Some of these answers can be found in the primary report, which suggests that the goal of aid transparency is to allow for effective policy planning and decision-making. The report states:

For aid to be more effective it needs to be more predictable, coordinated between donors, managed for results, and aligned to recipient countries’ own plans and systems. To achieve this, the information has to be shared between all parties involved in the delivery of aid in a timely, comprehensive and comparable way. Without this information it is not possible to know what is being spent where, by whom and with what results.

This makes sense … but I don’t know if I would normally associate this goal with “transparency.” To me, transparency has more to do with promoting accountability and providing information to citizens about what their Government is doing. The aid Index seems to be more about project coordination, efficiency and data governance. (Later on in the report, the text does mention that citizens will want to know where their money is going … more of a traditional goal of transparency.)

One of the major tools in the push for transparency is the development of a common standard for publishing aid information through the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI). The IATI registry has improved the quality and transparency of aid information, particularly for organizations that have either automated their publication or have already begun to address gaps and inconsistencies.

So, is there a story in the development and adoption of this standard? The report itself suggests that the purpose of the Index is in flux and asks whether a simpler methodology could still achieve the goal of providing effective, efficient and accountable aid information.

As I thought about this chart, I decided that any overview should show both the total transparency score and some measure of improvement from the previous year (there is both a 2011 and 2012 score). I decided on a scatterplot with the total score on the horizontal axis and the change in score (a ratio or percent) from 2011 to 2012 on the vertical axis. Along the right side I also thought I’d include a regular bar chart sorted by score.

A static sketch of this first chart:

I like the way the scatterplot emphasizes both the overall score and the year-over-year improvement. This shows organziations that have made progress toward the ultimate goal of transparency but may not have reached the heights of a group like the World Bank. The bar chart on the right shows standard ranking.

From this chart, the user should be able to navigate to details for each agency. I’d like to see comparisons of each sub-level (agency, organization, country) as well as the individual survey questions. There’s a pretty interesting chart toward the end of the report that shows the responses to all questions for all agenies as colored dots. It is intriguing and might offert some direction to these detailed charts. Otherwise it may be worth exploring standard charts.

 

 

One thought on “Infographics and Data Visualization (Week 3)

  1. Pingback: Visualizing World Aid Transparency | VizThinker

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